Field-Electron Emission from Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Lying on a Surface

TitleField-Electron Emission from Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Lying on a Surface
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsNojeh, A., R. Fabian, and W. Pease
Conference NameElectrical and Computer Engineering, 2007. CCECE 2007. Canadian Conference on
Pagination1294 -1297
Date Publishedapr.
Keywordscarbon nanotubes, dielectric materials, dielectric surface, electron emitters, electron field emission, electron-beam lithography, field-electron emission, Fowler-Nordheim model, free-electron analog to digital converters, mechanical stability, mechanical strength, microscopy systems, nanoscale vacuum tubes, silicon dioxide surface, single-walled carbon nanotubes, vertically-aligned nanotubes
Abstract

Single-walled carbon nanotubes are excellent candidates for electron emitters because of their sharp geometry, mechanical strength and capacity for carrying extremely high current densities. So far, the majority of field-emission experiments have been conducted on structures containing brushes of vertically-aligned nanotubes, or individual freestanding ones mounted on a sharp tip. However, nanotubes lying on a dielectric surface can present advantages due to higher mechanical stability and ability to carry more current. Here, electron emission from individual single-walled nanotubes resting on a silicon dioxide surface is investigated. It is observed that these emitters do not follow the traditional Fowler-Nordheim model. These devices could have a wide range of applications in field-emission displays, electron-beam lithography and microscopy systems, free-electron analog to digital converters, and nanoscale vacuum tubes.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CCECE.2007.329
DOI10.1109/CCECE.2007.329

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