Time-delay estimation in ultrasound echo signals using individual sample tracking

TitleTime-delay estimation in ultrasound echo signals using individual sample tracking
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsZahiri-Azar, R., and S. Salcudean
JournalUltrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, IEEE Transactions on
Volume55
Pagination2640 -2650
Date Publisheddec.
ISSN0885-3010
Keywordsbiomedical ultrasonics, signal processing, signal processing applications, spline-based continuous time-delay estimators, standard deviation, time-delay estimator, tracking algorithms, ultrasound echo signals, window-based algorithms, zero-crossing tracking delay estimator
Abstract

The performance of many signal-processing applications in ultrasound medical imaging, including elastography, blood flow imaging, tissue velocity imaging, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, depends on the performance of their time-delay estimators. In this paper, we present a new time-delay estimator based on the tracking of individual samples using a continuous representation of the echo signal. We also present the use of the same interpolation approach to improve the performance of the zero-crossing tracking delay estimator. Simulation results show that sample tracking algorithms significantly outperform commonly used window-based algorithms in terms of bias and standard deviation. Sample tracking algorithms also have higher sensitivity and resolution compared with traditional delay estimators, including recently introduced spline-based continuous time-delay estimators, because they provide the displacement of individual samples. Experimental results demonstrating the viability of sample tracking delay estimation are also presented.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TUFFC.2008.979
DOI10.1109/TUFFC.2008.979

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