Code-phase-shift keying: a power and bandwidth efficient spread spectrum signaling technique for wireless local area network applications

TitleCode-phase-shift keying: a power and bandwidth efficient spread spectrum signaling technique for wireless local area network applications
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication1997
AuthorsWong, A. Y. - C., and V. C. M. Leung
Conference NameElectrical and Computer Engineering, 1997. IEEE 1997 Canadian Conference on
Pagination478 -481 vol.2
Date Publishedmay.
KeywordsAWGN, bandwidth efficiency, carrier frequency tone interference, code phase shift keying, CPSK, direct sequence spread spectrum signaling, DS-SS, fading, Gaussian channels, jamming, M-ary signaling, multipath channels, performance, performance evaluation, phase shift keying, power efficiency, pseudonoise code sequence, pseudonoise codes, radio receivers, RAKE receiver, Rayleigh channels, Rayleigh fading channel, Rician channels, Rician fading channel, single tone jamming, spread spectrum communication, telecommunication signalling, thermal noise, thermal noise immunity, wireless LAN, wireless local area network applications
Abstract

Code-phase-shift keying (CPSK) is a novel direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DS-SS) signaling system employing M different code phase shifts of a single pseudonoise (PN) code sequence for M-ary signaling. CPSK offers increasing thermal noise immunity as M increases, and totally mitigates the effect of carrier frequency tone interference. It maintains good performance in a Rician fading channel, and a RAKE receiver could be used to improve the performance in a Rayleigh fading channel. The improved power and bandwidth efficiency of CPSK makes it suitable for wireless local area network applications

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CCECE.1997.608262
DOI10.1109/CCECE.1997.608262

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