Performance of trellis coded modulation schemes on shadowed mobile satellite communication channels

TitlePerformance of trellis coded modulation schemes on shadowed mobile satellite communication channels
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1994
AuthorsTellambura, C., Q. Wang, and V. K. Bhargava
JournalVehicular Technology, IEEE Transactions on
Volume43
Pagination128 -139
Date Publishedfeb.
ISSN0018-9545
KeywordsCanadian mobile satellite channel, differential detection, error statistics, fading, foliage attenuation, ideal coherent detection, interleaving, lognormal component, mobile radio systems, MSAT channel, multipath fading, pairwise error probability, PEP, pilot-tone aided detection, radiowave propagation, Rayleigh component, satellite links, shadowed mobile satellite communication channels, shadowed Rician process, signal detection, TCM, telecommunication channels, trellis coded modulation schemes, trellis codes
Abstract

The Canadian mobile satellite (MSAT) channel has been modeled as the sum of lognormal and Rayleigh components to represent foliage attenuation and multipath fading, respectively. Several authors have applied trellis coded modulation (TCM) schemes to this channel, estimating the bit error performance via computer simulation. In the present paper, analytical expressions are derived for the pairwise error probability (PEP) of TCM schemes over this channel under ideal interleaving. The analysis is applied to three detection strategies: ideal coherent detection, pilot-tone aided detection, and differential detection. The results are substantiated by means of computer simulation. In addition, first-order statistics of absolute and differential phases of a shadowed Rician process are examined

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/25.282273
DOI10.1109/25.282273

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