Chaotic pulsing and quasi-periodic route to chaos in a semiconductor laser with delayed opto-electronic feedback

TitleChaotic pulsing and quasi-periodic route to chaos in a semiconductor laser with delayed opto-electronic feedback
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsTang, S., and J. M. Liu
JournalQuantum Electronics, IEEE Journal of
Volume37
Pagination329 -336
Date Publishedmar.
ISSN0018-9197
Keywordsbandpass characteristics, chaotic pulsing, chaotic pulsing state, delay times, delayed opto-electronic feedback, delayed positive opto-electronic feedback, dynamical state, electronic feedback loop, experimental observation, feedback loop, fractal correlation dimension, fractals, laser beams, laser feedback, Lyapunov methods, nonlinear optics, numerical analysis, numerical results, numerical simulation, optical chaos, positive Lyapunov exponent, qualitative agreement, quantitative discrepancy, quasi-periodic route, semiconductor laser, Semiconductor lasers
Abstract

Chaotic pulsing and the route to chaos in a semiconductor laser with delayed, positive opto-electronic feedback are investigated numerically and experimentally. Both numerical simulation and experimental observation indicate that the laser enters a chaotic pulsing state at certain delay times of the feedback loop through a quasi-periodic route. The characteristics of each dynamical state are analyzed. The chaotic pulsing state is verified with a positive Lyapunov exponent and a fractal correlation dimension. The experimental results show very good qualitative agreement with the numerical results. Quantitative discrepancy between experimental and numerical results can be explained by the bandpass characteristics of the electronic feedback loop

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/3.910441
DOI10.1109/3.910441

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