Impact of Tone Interference on Multiband OFDM

TitleImpact of Tone Interference on Multiband OFDM
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsSnow, C., L. Lampe, and R. Schober
Conference NameUltra-Wideband, The 2006 IEEE 2006 International Conference on
Pagination249 -254
Date Publishedsep.
Keywordsapproximation, approximation theory, coded multicarrier systems, decoding, error statistics, error-rate estimation method, fading channels, frequency-selective channel, interference (signal), modulation coding, multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing, narrowband interference, OFDM, OFDM modulation, quasistatic fading channel, receiver, signal interference, tone interference, ultra wideband communication, ultra-wideband communication, UWB
Abstract

We study the effect of narrowband interference on the error rate of coded multicarrier systems operating over frequency-selective, quasi-static fading channels with non-ideal interleaving. For this purpose we model the interfering signal as a sum of tone interferers, and develop an error-rate estimation method to approximate the performance of the system over each realization of the channel. This method is suitable for obtaining the outage as well as average performance of the system. The analysis is used to quantify the impact of tone interference on the multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) proposal for high data-rate ultra-wideband (UWB) communication. The results indicate that tone interference may have a significant impact on multiband OFDM, but that this performance degradation can be mitigated by the use of erasure marking and decoding at the receiver, assuming the receiver can acquire knowledge of the subcarriers impacted by the interfering signal

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICU.2006.281558
DOI10.1109/ICU.2006.281558

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