Effect of front hole channel on leakage characteristics of a-Si:H TFTs

TitleEffect of front hole channel on leakage characteristics of a-Si:H TFTs
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsServati, P., A. Nathan, and A. Sazonov
Conference NameMicroelectronics, 2000. ICM 2000. Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on
Pagination247 -250
Keywordsa-Si:H inverted staggered TFTs, a-Si:H TFTs, amorphous semiconductors, channel formation, drain-source conduction path, electrical contacts, elemental semiconductors, front a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H interface, front hole channel, front hole channel effect, gate contact, gate contact negative voltage, geometry dependence, hole accumulation, hole density, hole mobility, hydrogen, hydrogenated amorphous silicon inverted staggered thin-film transistors, inverted staggered thin-film transistors, leakage characteristics, leakage currents, screening effect, semiconductor device models, Si:H-SiN:H, silicon, thin film transistors, transistor off-state, vertical electric field, voltage dependence
Abstract

This paper explores, from a theoretical standpoint, the effect of a front hole channel formed by virtue of a negative voltage applied at the gate contact, on leakage characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) inverted staggered thin-film transistors (TFTs). Holes are accumulated at the front a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H interface forming a channel, which establishes a conduction path between drain and source when the transistor is in its off-state (VGS lt;0). The accumulation of holes screens the vertical electric field induced by the gate contact. This screening effect explains the voltage and geometry dependence of the leakage characteristics of the TFT

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICM.2000.916454
DOI10.1109/ICM.2000.916454

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