Can a new design of pneumatic compression device reduce variations in delivered therapy for the mechanical prophylaxis of thromboembolic disease after total hip arthroplasty?

TitleCan a new design of pneumatic compression device reduce variations in delivered therapy for the mechanical prophylaxis of thromboembolic disease after total hip arthroplasty?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsMasri, B. A., D. J. Dunlop, J. A. McEwen, D. S. Garbuz, and C. P. Duncan
JournalCanadian Journal of Surgery
Volume47
Pagination263–269
ISSN0008-428X
Abstract

Background: Compression devices have been shown to prevent thromboembolic disease. However, the pressures generated may not be the same as the ones recommended by the manufacturer. The purpose of this study is to investigate a new sequential compression device with feedback to maintain optimal therapy, and to determine whether therapy is improved with this new device. Patients and method: A series of 50 patients undergoing elective total hip arthroplasty at a major tertiary-care hospital with a special interest in joint replacement were enrolled prospectively. In addition to pharmacological prophylaxis for thromboembolic disease, all patients received compression from a modified device. Maximum pressures generated and the rate of pressure rise in each of the 3 compartments within the device sleeves were measured and the results compared with data from historical controls. Results: We considered therapy to be ideal when in a particular compression cycle all chambers of both right and left sleeves reach within 10% of their target pressures at within 10% of their target pressure rise rates. The average patient received this ideal therapy 88% of the time that the new trial sequential compression device was operating. This represents a dramatic improvement over previous devices. Conclusions: The new device allows dramatically improved pressures within the device because of a feedback loop that allows dynamic control of each chamber's pressure. Improved consistency of delivery should make it easier to accurately assess the true benefits of mechanical prophylaxis wit a sequential compression device.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

Electrical and Computer Engineering
2332 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z4
Tel +1.604.822.2872
Fax +1.604.822.5949
Email:

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright 2020 The University of British Columbia