Low redundancy layered multiple description scalable coding using the subband extension of H.264/AVC

TitleLow redundancy layered multiple description scalable coding using the subband extension of H.264/AVC
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsMansour, H., P. Nasiopoulos, and V. C. M. Leung
Conference NameCircuits and Systems, 2005. ISCAS 2005. IEEE International Symposium on
Pagination4042 - 4045 Vol. 4
Date Publishedmay.
Keywordsbandwidth utilization, coding efficiency, error resilience, H.264/AVC subband extension, layered multiple description scalable coding, LMDSC, low redundancy scalable coding, MDC, packet delay recovery, packet loss recovery, PSNR improvement, video coding, wireless video broadcasting
Abstract

The task of broadcasting video in wireless environments requires high coding efficiency in addition to reliable error resilience techniques. Existing solutions are set to tackle either coding efficiency and bandwidth utilization on the one hand, or error resilience and recovery from packet delay or loss on the other. We propose a novel combined approach to deal with the problem of video broadcast over wireless networks by offering a layered multiple description scalable coding (LMDSC) technique using the subband extension of H.264. This approach combines the high coding efficiency and layered structure of the subband extension of H.264/AVC along with the highly error resilient performance of multiple description coding (MDC) while virtually eliminating all redundancy between the transmitted video streams. Performance evaluations show that when faced with the same amount of packet loss, our approach achieves significant improvement in PSNR over existing methods.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ISCAS.2005.1465518
DOI10.1109/ISCAS.2005.1465518

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