Real-time broadband services with jitter control over ATM satellite bridges

TitleReal-time broadband services with jitter control over ATM satellite bridges
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication1998
AuthorsLe Pocher, H., V. C. M. Leung, and D. Gillies
Conference NameCommunications, 1998. ICC 98. Conference Record.1998 IEEE International Conference on
Pagination84 -88 vol.1
Date Publishedjun.
Keywordsaccess protocols, asynchronous transfer mode, ATM satellite bridges, broadband networks, cell delay variation, cell transfer delay, delays, generic scheduler, IWU protocol, jitter, jitter control, quality of service, queued cells, queueing theory, real-time broadband services, real-time traffic, satellite communication, satellite interworking unit, satellite throughput, service deadlines, service priorities, shared transmission medium, short duration link-level frames, simulation results, static TDMA MAC, telecommunication traffic, time division multiple access, uplink earth station
Abstract

A generic satellite interworking unit (IWU) is proposed for delivering real-time traffic across an arbitrary satellite bridge employing asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). End-to-end cell transfer delay (CTD) and cell delay variation (CDV) bounds are provided by logically associating cells to short duration link-level frames. In addition, a generic scheduler is proposed for the uplink earth station (ES). This scheduler only defines the service priorities and deadlines of queued cells but does not define the particular fashion in which an ES gains access to the shared transmission medium. Simulation results demonstrate that the quality of service (QoS) can be efficiently managed in order to maximize satellite throughput of real-time traffic

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICC.1998.682591
DOI10.1109/ICC.1998.682591

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