Capacitively-loaded travelling-wave electrodes for electro-optic modulators

TitleCapacitively-loaded travelling-wave electrodes for electro-optic modulators
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication1995
AuthorsJaeger, N. A. F., F. Rahmatian, H. Kato, R. James, and E. Berolo
Conference NameElectrical and Computer Engineering, 1995. Canadian Conference on
Pagination1166 -1169 vol.2
Date Publishedsep.
Keywords40 GHz, AlGaAs, AlGaAs waveguides, attenuation measurements, capacitively-loaded travelling-wave electrodes, coplanar strip electrodes, coplanar waveguides, electro-optic modulators, electro-optical modulation, electrodes, electromagnetic wave absorption, GaAs, graded index waveguides, gradient index optics, InGaAsP, InGaAsP waveguides, InP, InP substrate, integrated optics, integrated-optic Mach-Zehnder type electro-optic modulators, losses, Mach-Zehnder interferometers, microwave index, microwave indices, microwave measurement, microwave/lightwave velocity-match condition, optical planar waveguides, semi-insulating GaAs substrate
Abstract

Capacitively-loaded, travelling-wave, coplanar strip electrodes were fabricated on a semi-insulating GaAs substrate. Microwave index and attenuation measurements were performed on them at frequencies up to 40 GHz. Such electrodes are intended for use in integrated-optic Mach-Zehnder type electro-optic modulators fabricated using compound semiconductors. They are, in fact, intended to achieve the necessary microwave/lightwave velocity-match condition for graded index AlGaAs or InGaAsP waveguides fabricated on GaAs or InP substrates. We report microwave indices close to 3.2 and losses as small as 2 dB/cm, measured at 40 GHz, for the structures studied here

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CCECE.1995.526638
DOI10.1109/CCECE.1995.526638

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