Reverse-link analysis and performance evaluation of H.263 video transmission for cellular DS/CDMA systems in frequency-selective lognormal-Nakagami fading

TitleReverse-link analysis and performance evaluation of H.263 video transmission for cellular DS/CDMA systems in frequency-selective lognormal-Nakagami fading
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsIskander, C. - D., and P. T. Mathiopoulos
Conference NameVehicular Technology Conference, 2001. VTC 2001 Spring. IEEE VTS 53rd
Pagination2041 -2045 vol.3
Keywordscellular DS/CDMA systems, cellular multicode IS-95B system, cellular radio, channel parameters, channel sharing, code division multiple access, fading channels, frequency-selective lognormal-Nakagami fading, H.263 video transmission, lognormal shadowing, multiple-cell performance, peak signal-to-noise ratio, performance evaluation, PSNR, reverse-link analysis, source coding, spread spectrum communication, threshold effect, video coding, video communication
Abstract

We present the analysis and performance evaluation of H.263 video transmission over the reverse link of a cellular multicode IS-95B system. Our study hence considers CDMA as the channel sharing technique, instead of TDMA which has been used in most previous studies. The frequency-selective channel exhibits Nakagami short-term fading and lognormal shadowing; such a general model allows us to observe the effect of the channel parameters on the video performance. We consider the multiple-cell performance for a more realistic assessment. The numerical results are presented in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). They indicate that, for each set of channel and receiver parameters, there is a threshold effect, i.e. a maximal number of users can be supported before the video communication breaks down

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/VETECS.2001.945055
DOI10.1109/VETECS.2001.945055

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