Dynamic assignment of random access code channels

TitleDynamic assignment of random access code channels
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsHossain, E., D. I. Kim, and V. K. Bhargava
Conference NameGlobal Telecommunications Conference, 2001. GLOBECOM '01. IEEE
Pagination3034 -3039 vol.5
Keywordsadaptation methods, adaptive QoS, bursty data packet arrival patterns, channel allocation, code division multiple access, data communication, Differentiated Services, dynamic code assignment, dynamic resource allocation, Internet protocol, mobile radio, performance, prioritized packet data transmission, quality of service, random access, Rayleigh channels, Rayleigh fading, WCDMA networks, wideband code division multiple access, wireless IP networks
Abstract

In this paper, a measurement-based dynamic RA (Random Access) code assignment procedure Is proposed for prioritized packet data transmission in WCDMA (Wideband Code Division Multiple Access) networks. This dynamic assignment process is based on analytical performance results derived for random packet access under Rayleigh fading in WCDMA networks. The performance of the proposed measurement-based RA code assignment procedure with three different adaptation methods is evaluated using computer simulation for bursty data packet arrival patterns. The performance of the proposed scheme is compared to those of a retransmission control-based and static channel allocation-based prioritized packet access schemes. The proposed scheme can be used in an adaptive QoS (Quality of Service) framework for dynamically adjusting the QoS of prioritized random access data traffic In the evolving WCDMA-based DS (Differentiated Services) wireless IP (Internet Protocol) networks

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/GLOCOM.2001.965984
DOI10.1109/GLOCOM.2001.965984

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