Joint optimization of energy consumption and antenna orientation for multicasting in static ad hoc wireless networks

TitleJoint optimization of energy consumption and antenna orientation for multicasting in static ad hoc wireless networks
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsGuo, S., O. Yang, and V. C. M. Leung
JournalWireless Communications, IEEE Transactions on
Volume5
Pagination2563 -2568
Date Publishedsep.
ISSN1536-1276
Keywordsad hoc networks, antenna orientation, directional antennas, directive antennas, energy consumption, heuristic algorithms, integer programming, linear programming, minimum-energy multicast and antenna orientation, mixed integer linear programming, multicast communication, multicast traffic, multicasting, static ad hoc wireless networks, switched antennas, telecommunication traffic, tree reconstruction, trees (mathematics)
Abstract

To explore the energy saving advantage offered by the use of directional antennas, we consider the case of source initiated multicast traffic in static ad hoc wireless networks that use switched antennas and have limited energy resources. We present a constraint formulation for the joint optimization problem MEM-AO (minimum-energy multicast and antenna orientation) in terms of MTLP (mixed integer linear programming). The optimal solution can be obtained using an MILP solver in a timely manner for moderately sized networks with switched antennas. In addition to the theoretical effort, we also provide two heuristic algorithms and a general post-process operation TR (tree reconstruction) for handling larger networks. The experimental results show that our TR operation significantly improves the performance of both heuristic algorithms

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TWC.2006.1687780
DOI10.1109/TWC.2006.1687780

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

Electrical and Computer Engineering
2332 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z4
Tel +1.604.822.2872
Fax +1.604.822.5949
Email:

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright 2020 The University of British Columbia