QoS routing for MPLS networks employing mobile agents

TitleQoS routing for MPLS networks employing mobile agents
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2002
AuthorsGonzález-Valenzuela, S., and V. C. M. Leung
JournalNetwork, IEEE
Volume16
Pagination16 -21
Date Publishedmay.
ISSN0890-8044
KeywordsDifferentiated Services, Internet backbone, mobile agents, mobile software agents, MPLS networks, multipoint-to-point routing trees, multiprotocol label switching, QoS provision, QoS routing, quality of service, routing algorithms, software agents, telecommunication computing, telecommunication network routing, telecommunication traffic, traffic streams, transport protocols, trees (mathematics), Wave paradigm
Abstract

The implementation of new networking technologies, such as multiprotocol label switching and differentiated services, will introduce powerful features to the near-future Internet backbone, making a significant contribution to the overall end-to-end provision of quality of service. However, to achieve such an improvement these technologies require not only effective support from current routing algorithms, but also enhanced capabilities, which are currently being developed. To contribute to this development, a novel and powerful scheme is introduced in this article that provides a means of supporting QoS routing through the use of mobile software agents. Specifically, we describe the use of mobile agents to efficiently realize multipoint-to-point routing trees by means of the Wave paradigm, while satisfying the QoS requirements of the set of traffic streams involved in the process. Both benefits and important issues to be considered when using mobile agent schemes in QoS routing are further stressed

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MNET.2002.1002995
DOI10.1109/MNET.2002.1002995

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