Modelling for Computer Controlled Neuromuscular Blockade

TitleModelling for Computer Controlled Neuromuscular Blockade
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsGilhuly, T. J., G. A. Dumont, and B. A. MacLeod
Conference NameEngineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2005. IEEE-EMBS 2005. 27th Annual International Conference of the
Pagination26 -29
Date Publishedjan.
Keywordsautomated neuromuscular blockade, computer controlled neuromuscular blockade, drug delivery systems, frequency domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, Humans, Laguerre representations, medical control systems, muscle, neurophysiology, optimal ARX, rabbits, rocuronium, stochastic processes
Abstract

In this paper we present data collection and methods for the selection of a model class with the goal of automated neuromuscular blockade (NMB). Neuromuscular response was measured in the presence of rocuronium in rabbits (N=S) and humans (N=14). An average response was formed and used to determine optimal ARX and Laguerre representations for a wide range of orders and parameters. A 6th order Laguerre model was selected based on its accuracy and simplicity. Models were identified for each subject. For each group, variation was measured by comparison to the average response. The standard deviation of the average impulse response static gain was 45.4 and 45.8% of the mean for the rabbit and human models, respectively. The range of static gain was 121 and 159% of the mean for the rabbit and human datasets. Frequency domain analysis showed differences in gain of 12 and 15dB, and phase of 45 and 75deg for the rabbit and human models respectively. With this knowledge, design and development of appropriate controllers for NMB will proceed

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2005.1616333
DOI10.1109/IEMBS.2005.1616333

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