A self-paced brain-computer interface system with a low false positive rate

TitleA self-paced brain-computer interface system with a low false positive rate
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsFatourechi, M., R. K. Ward, and G. E. Birch
JournalJ Neural Eng
Volume5
Pagination9-23
Date PublishedMar
Abstract

The performance of current EEG-based self-paced brain-computer interface (SBCI) systems is not suitable for most practical applications. In this paper, an improved SBCI that uses features extracted from three neurological phenomena (movement-related potentials, changes in the power of Mu rhythms and changes in the power of Beta rhythms) to detect an intentional control command in noisy EEG signals is proposed. The proposed system achieves a high true positive (TP) to false positive (FP) ratio. To extract features for each neurological phenomenon in every EEG signal, a method that consists of a stationary wavelet transform followed by matched filtering is developed. For each neurological phenomenon in every EEG channel, features are classified using a support vector machine classifier (SVM). For each neurological phenomenon, a multiple classifier system (MCS) then combines the outputs of the SVMs. Another MCS combines the outputs of MCSs designed for the three neurological phenomena. Various configurations for combining the outputs of these MCSs are considered. A hybrid genetic algorithm (HGA) is proposed to simultaneously select the features, the values of the classifiers' parameters and the configuration for combining MCSs that yield the near optimal performance. Analysis of the data recorded from four able-bodied subjects shows a significant performance improvement over previous SBCIs.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1741-2560/5/1/002
DOI10.1088/1741-2560/5/1/002

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