Supporting isochronous ATM traffic over IEEE 802.14 based HFC access networks

TitleSupporting isochronous ATM traffic over IEEE 802.14 based HFC access networks
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication1998
AuthorsElfeitori, A. A., and H. Alnuweiri
Conference NameElectrical and Computer Engineering, 1998. IEEE Canadian Conference on
Pagination625 -627 vol.2
Date Publishedmay.
Keywordsaccess protocols, asynchronous transfer mode, bandwidth allocation, bandwidth utilization, cable television, CBR service, constant bit rate service, hybrid fiber coaxial access networks, hybrid fibre coax networks, IEEE 802.14 based HFC access networks, IEEE standards, Internet access, isochronous asynchronous transfer mode traffic, isochronous ATM traffic, MAC protocols, medium access control protocols, multi-service HFC network, network architecture, network topology, quality of service, real time voice traffic, telecommunication standards, voice telephony
Abstract

We address the issue of supporting isochronous ATM traffic (e.g., real time (RT) voice traffic) over IEEE 802.14 based hybrid fiber coaxial (HFC) access networks. We propose a network architecture for a multi-service HFC network that can be used to support multiple services such as voice telephony and Internet access. Also, we propose enhancements to the 802.14 medium access control (MAC) protocols to facilitate supporting isochronous asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) traffic over HFC networks. In particular, we propose enhancements to the constant bit rate (CBR) service of 802.14 MAC protocol. We show that good quality of service, and enhanced bandwidth utilization are achieved using the proposed scheme. Our proposal facilitates the migration towards end-to-end ATM networks

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CCECE.1998.685574
DOI10.1109/CCECE.1998.685574

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