Interactive simulation of needle insertion models

TitleInteractive simulation of needle insertion models
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsDiMaio, S. P., and S. E. Salcudean
JournalBiomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on
Volume52
Pagination1167 -1179
Date Publishedjul.
ISSN0018-9294
KeywordsAlgorithms, Animals, Biological, biological tissues, biomechanics, biopsy, boundary condition, computational complexity, computer simulation, Computer Systems, Computer-Assisted, condensation, Connective Tissue, deformation, Drug Therapy, elasticity, haptic interfaces, Humans, Injections, interactive virtual needle insertion simulation, large-strain elastic needle model, linear simulation models, local material coordinate changes, Mechanical, Models, Motion, Needle, needle bending, needle deflection, needle insertion forces, needle motion, needles, patient treatment, Physical Stimulation, physiological models, planar haptic interface, planar tissue deformations, steering torques, Stress, User-Computer Interface
Abstract

A novel interactive virtual needle insertion simulation is presented. The simulation models are based on measured planar tissue deformations and needle insertion forces. Since the force-displacement relationship is only of interest along the needle shaft, a condensation technique is shown to reduce the computational complexity of linear simulation models significantly. As the needle penetrates or is withdrawn from the tissue model, the boundary conditions that determine the tissue and needle motion change. Boundary condition and local material coordinate changes are facilitated by fast low-rank matrix updates. A large-strain elastic needle model is coupled to the tissue models to account for needle deflection and bending during simulated insertion. A haptic environment, based on these novel interactive simulation techniques, allows users to manipulate a three-degree-of-freedom virtual needle as it penetrates virtual tissue models, while experiencing steering torques and lateral needle forces through a planar haptic interface.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TBME.2005.847548
DOI10.1109/TBME.2005.847548

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