Performance analysis of reservation arbitrated (RA) access for statistical multiplexing voice traffic over dual bus metropolitan area networks

TitlePerformance analysis of reservation arbitrated (RA) access for statistical multiplexing voice traffic over dual bus metropolitan area networks
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication1995
AuthorsChan, H. C. B., and V. C. M. Leung
Conference NameGlobal Telecommunications Conference, 1995. GLOBECOM '95., IEEE
Pagination675 -679 vol.1
Date Publishednov.
Keywordsaccess protocol, access protocols, channel capacity, channel utilization, dual bus metropolitan area networks, IEEE 802.6, IEEE standards, isochronous channel, metropolitan area networks, packet switching, performance analysis, performance evaluation, quality of speech, real voice signal, reservation arbitrated access, statistical multiplexing voice traffic, talk-spurt, telecommunication standards, voice channel, voice communication
Abstract

This paper analyzes the performance of a novel RA access protocol for full statistical multiplexing of voice calls over IEEE 802.6 metropolitan area networks (MANs). The protocol acquires a voice channel at the beginning of each talk-spurt and if successful, keeps the isochronous channel in reservation for the duration of the demand. System performance is evaluated by both analytical modeling and computer simulations. To assess the quality of speech transported by RA access, simulations using a real voice signal are also presented. Results indicate that RA access provides significant improvements in channel utilization compared to pre-arbitrated access while maintaining a nearly isochronous transport service

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/GLOCOM.1995.502014
DOI10.1109/GLOCOM.1995.502014

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