The LF-ASD brain computer interface: on-line identification of imagined finger flexions in the spontaneous EEG of able-bodied subjects

TitleThe LF-ASD brain computer interface: on-line identification of imagined finger flexions in the spontaneous EEG of able-bodied subjects
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsBozorgzadeh, Z., G. E. Birch, and S. G. Mason
Conference NameAcoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 2000. ICASSP '00. Proceedings. 2000 IEEE International Conference on
Pagination2385 -2388 vol.4
Keywordsable-bodied subjects, active control, asynchronous control applications, attentive idleness, computer interfaces, computerised control, electroencephalography, false-positive rate, handicapped aids, hit rate, imagined finger flexions, imagined voluntary movements, index finger, LF-ASD brain-computer interface, low-frequency asynchronous switch design, medical signal processing, motor disabilities, online identification, online operation, online switch operation, spontaneous EEG, switches, true-positive rate
Abstract

Focuses on developing a brain-computer interface (BCT) for asynchronous control applications, which are characterized by alternating periods of active control and attentive idleness. We have developed an asynchronous switch that users can control through their EEG. The online implementation of the Low-Frequency Asynchronous Switch Design (LF-ASD) system has shown promising results with actual index finger flexions by able-bodied subjects. This paper reports the results of the algorithm on imagined voluntary movements with able-bodied persons, demonstrating hit (true-positive) rates above 70% and false-positive rates below 3%. This work is a precursor to verifying an online switch operation for people with severe motor disabilities

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICASSP.2000.859321
DOI10.1109/ICASSP.2000.859321

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