Comparison of Using Mono-Polar and Bipolar Electroencephalogram (EEG) Electrodes for Detection of Right and Left Hand Movements in a Self-Paced Brain Computer Interface (BCI)

TitleComparison of Using Mono-Polar and Bipolar Electroencephalogram (EEG) Electrodes for Detection of Right and Left Hand Movements in a Self-Paced Brain Computer Interface (BCI)
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsBashashati, A., R. K. Ward, and G. E. Birch
Conference NameElectrical and Computer Engineering, 2007. CCECE 2007. Canadian Conference on
Pagination725 -728
Date Publishedapr.
Keywordsbipolar electroencephalogram electrodes, brain states detection, electroencephalography, human computer interaction, left hand movements detection, medical computing, mono-polar electroencephalogram electrodes, right hand movements detection, self-paced brain computer interface
Abstract

Unlike synchronous brain computer interfaces (BCI), self-paced (asynchronous) ones have the advantage of being operational at all times and not only at specific system-defined periods. A 3-state self-paced BCI is capable of detecting two different brain states (e.g. two movements) from the ongoing EEG. However, a 2-state one can only detect one brain state from the ongoing EEG. This study evaluates the performance of a 3-state self-paced BCI in detecting right and left hand movements. At first, we compare the performance of the system in differentiating between right and left hand movements using two different inputs: (1) mono-polar, and (2) bipolar electrode setting. Using bipolar electrode setting which yielded better performance than a mono-polar one, we evaluate the overall performance of the 3-state BCI system in a self-paced testing paradigm. Using data collected from two able-bodied individuals, it is shown that the average performance (true positive rate) of the system in detecting the presence of movements is 54.7% at a fixed false positive rate of 1%, and the average performance of the system in differentiating between right and left hand movements is 70.25%.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CCECE.2007.186
DOI10.1109/CCECE.2007.186

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