A haptic-based system for medical image examination

TitleA haptic-based system for medical image examination
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsAbolmaesumi, P., K. Hashtrudi-Zaad, D. Thompson, and A. Tahmasebi
Conference NameEngineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2004. IEMBS '04. 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE
Pagination1853 -1856
Date Publishedsep.
Keywordsbiomedical ultrasonics, computerised tomography, force feedback, force feedback haptic device, haptic interface, haptic interfaces, haptic-based simulator, haptic-based system, medical image examination, medical image processing, patient anatomy, position correspondence, radiology residents, sonographers, training system, virtual patient, virtual probe position, volumetric images
Abstract

This work presents a haptic-based simulator for training of radiology residents and sonographers. The system consists of a force feedback haptic device providing means to interact in real-time with volumetric images of a virtual patient, captured pre-operatively from several subjects. The training system allows trainees to develop radiology techniques and knowledge of the patient's anatomy with minimum practice on live patients, or in places or at times when radiology devices or patients with rare cases may not be available. The haptic interface guarantees position correspondence between the operator's hand and a virtual probe position that slices medical volume sets in the plane of the probe. Thus the simulated procedure becomes nearly identical to the real examinations at the hospital. Different configurations of the system are implemented and presented. Future potential applications for the system are discussed as well.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2004.1403551
DOI10.1109/IEMBS.2004.1403551

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